EditorialOpinion

Waterloo Corroboree

Waterloo Corroboree was an idea that came out of an Aboriginal community group get-together. There was a call-out for something to be done about anti-social behaviour around Waterloo, in particular the Dobell building, involving local youth.

Waterloo Corroboree.  Photo: Charmaine Jones

Waterloo Corroboree. Photo: Charmaine Jones

A committee was formed, comprising community members from all different Aboriginal family backgrounds including single mums, single dads and grandparents wanting to help break the cycle of anti-social behaviour. Everyone wanted something to change.

In the context of the redevelopment, we knew there was a great opportunity to do something representative of Aboriginal cultural protocol. That is when we contacted Joe Williams (athlete, motivational speaker and author).

The corroboree meant so many things to us, from igniting a spiritual fire within community to sending off spirits properly for community to heal.

On the day (May 26) there were so many things happening that the whole community was able to get involved – from the spreading of the sand to participating in the dance workshops and then joining in on the night with the rest of the dancers, who came from all over the country. Some even drove nine hours from Brisbane to take part.

The community was left awestruck and wants more, asking numerous times, “When will the next one be on?”

 

 

 

Jinny-Jane Smith is the Aboriginal Liaison Officer for the Waterloo Redevelopment.

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